Management

Soundview Executive Book Summaries® publishes summaries of the best business books of each year on management issues including change management, managing people, crisis management, managing a virtual workforce, project management and more. Browse our extensive collection of management book summaries to solve your most difficult issues.

  • Image of Good Boss, Bad Boss
    Image of Good Boss, Bad Boss

    How to Be the Best... and Learn from the Worst

    by Robert I. Sutton

    How a boss wields his or her power over an employee is bound to result in feelings that might include resentment, confusion or possibly comfort. If you are a boss, are you attuned to how your words and actions affect your employees? Good Boss, Bad Boss is for bosses and those who have bosses. It details how to adopt the characteristics of a good boss and survive the flaws of a bad boss. Dr. Sutton uses real-life case studies and behavioral science research to reveal exactly what the...

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  • Image of Escape Velocity
    Image of Escape Velocity

    Free Your Company's Future from the Pull of the Past

    by Geoffrey A. Moore

    Geoffrey Moore's now-classic Crossing the Chasm became a must-read book by presenting an innovative framework to address the make-or-break obstacle facing all high-tech companies: how to gain market share from early adopters and from mainstream consumers. Now, Moore's Escape Velocity offers a pragmatic plan to engage the most critical challenge that established enterprises face in the twenty-first-century economy: how to move beyond past success and drive next-generation...

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  • Image of The Set-Up-To-Fail Syndrome
    Image of The Set-Up-To-Fail Syndrome

    How Good Managers Cause Great People to Fail

    by Jean-Francois Manzoni, Jean-Louis Barsoux

    Manzoni, Associate Professor of Management at the world-renowned INSEAD business school in France, and Barsoux, a Senior Research Fellow at INSEAD, reveal the all-too-common phenomenon of employees, including those with great potential, who fail because of their superiors’ attitudes and behaviors. The start of the problem: managers who are too quick to label some employees as “under-performers” — and who then view any actions by these employees in a negative light.

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