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  • Image of Blink
    Image of Blink

    The Power of Thinking without Thinking

    by Malcolm Gladwell

    Blink is about how we think without thinking, about choices that seem to be made in an instant — in the blink of an eye — that actually aren’t as simple as they seem, and about those instantaneous decisions that are impossible to explain to others. In this summary, staff writer from The New Yorker Malcolm Gladwell reveals that great decision makers aren’t those who process the most information or spend the most time deliberating, but those who have perfected the art of...

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  • Image of Management Wisdom From the New York Yankees’ Dynasty
    Image of Management Wisdom From the New York Yankees’ Dynasty

    What Every Manager Can Learn from a Legendary Team's 80-Year Winning Streak

    by Lance Berger

    Author Lance Berger is a management consultant to Fortune 500 companies and has served as a consultant to Major League Baseball. After looking deeply into the history of the Yankees’ organization, Berger discovered that many of the same principles that made the Yankees great were also driving the success of business clients. These core principles are based on leadership, processes and culture. In Management Wisdom From the New York Yankees’ Dynasty, Berger offers time-tested management

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  • Image of The Growth Gamble
    Image of The Growth Gamble

    When Leaders Should Bet Big on New Business, and how They Can Avoid Expensive Failures

    by Robert Park, Andrew Campbell

    Conventional business wisdom dictates that companies should focus their sights on growth. But growth is no certain thing, say the authors of The Growth Gamble. Not all companies are built for rapid growth: Their markets are unsteady or extremely competitive, their infrastructure is not sufficiently flexible, or they don’t have the quality or quantity of people to lend to the effort. For these companies, a slow or steady growth curve, over years or even decades, is the healthiest option.

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  • Image of The Enthusiastic Employee
    Image of The Enthusiastic Employee

    How Companies Profit by Giving Workers What They Want

    by Michael Irwin Meltzer, David Sirota, Louis Mischkind

    Enthusiastic employees outproduce and outperform employees who are not motivated to perform. In The Enthusiastic Employee, three employee management experts from Sirota Consulting offer 30 years of research and experience to show readers exactly what managers are doing wrong — and what they should do instead. Drawing on detailed case studies and employee attitude surveys from hundreds of companies, the authors describe a dollars-and-cents business case for high employee morale, and pres

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  • Image of The 7 Hidden Reasons Employees Leave
    Image of The 7 Hidden Reasons Employees Leave

    How to Recognize the Subtle Signs and Act before It's Too Late

    by Leigh Branham

    In The 7 Hidden Reasons Employees Leave, employee-retention expert Leigh Branham knocks down the wall that separates employee from employer — and even management from senior leadership — in an effort to forge an open discussion on employee disengagement and what organizations need to recognize and actively pursue in order to retain their best and brightest people. Using a voluminous amount of interview and survey data, Branham isolates each reason, tells companies what to look for, and

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  • Image of How Customers Think
    Image of How Customers Think

    Essential Insights into the Mind of the Market

    by Gerald (Jerry) Zaltman

    Why do 80 percent of new products despite the best efforts of market researchers -- through techniques such as focus groups and market surveys -- to predict what customers want. According to Harvard Business School marketing professor Gerald Zaltman, the reason for the failure of traditional market research methods is that they depend on customers consciously knowing what they want and what they will buy. However, customer behavior toward products and brands is often driven by the unconscious, r

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  • Image of Stronger in the Broken Places
    Image of Stronger in the Broken Places

    Nine Lessons for Turning Crisis into Triumph

    by James Lee Witt, James Morgan

    As the director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency from 1993 until 2001, James Lee Witt witnessed some of the worst crises Mother Nature, chance and certain humans had to offer — earthquakes, floods, airline crashes, the Oklahoma City bombing, and more. Through it all, he not only drastically improved the reputation FEMA had among lawmakers and crisis victims and survivors alike (his leadership rescued the flagging agency), he also developed a strategy for managing crises — a customer-ce

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  • Image of Voice Power
    Image of Voice Power

    Using Your Voice to Captivate, Persuade, and Command Attention

    by Renee Grant-Williams

    While everyone has a voice, not every voice is one that gets attention — a personal weakness often overlooked. The concept of “dressing for success” — creating the right appearance — is second nature by now. However, most people are unaware that their voices account for one-third of the total impression they make on others (the other factors are appearance and message). In this summary, Renee Grant-Williams, who has worked with U.S. senators, business executives and sales professionals, as well

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  • Image of How Organizations Work
    Image of How Organizations Work

    Taking a Holistic Approach to Enterprise Health

    by Alan P. Brache

    Organizations are like humans. Each organ, muscle, bone, and nerve plays a unique part within the whole. A strong contribution from one component can’t make up for deficiencies in others, and understanding each component doesn’t explain the health of the whole person. Body functions are integrated and their interactions are as important as their individual roles. So are the different functions in an organization. This summary shows you how to take a holistic approach to organizational wellness b

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