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Speed Review: Twitter Is Not a Strategy

Speed Review: Twitter Is Not a Strategy

Speed Review: Twitter Is Not a Strategy

Rediscovering the Art of Brand Marketing

by Tom Doctoroff

The tension between traditional branding and the seemingly unlimited possibilities presented by the advent of "digital" branding leads companies to abandon the tried and true aspects of marketing for the flash of the new. In Twitter is Not a Strategy, Doctoroff explains why a strategy that truly integrates the two ideas is the best way for a brand to move into the future. Using some of the biggest brand names in the world as examples, such as Coca-Cola, Nike, and Apple, he breaks down the framework of marketing to explain how digital marketing can't stand without the traditional foundation.

Review

Marketing In A Digital World

There are a lot of shiny objects in the world of marketing today. Traditional marketing channels such as television and print media ads are being outshone by the flashier marketing opportunities of the digital age, including big data mining and social media marketing. Many marketing experts happily sound the death knell of traditional marketing: television ads might have worked in the time of the giant television console with its rabbit ears, but this is the age of Hulu and Netflix.

In a new book titled Twitter Is Not a Strategy, Tom Doctoroff, CEO of J. Walter Thompson Asia, begs to differ. Given that global television advertising revenues are forecast to grow from $162 billion in 2012 to more than $200 billion in 2017, according to PriceWaterhouseCoopers, it seems a bit disingenuous, he writes, to say that television advertising is dead. The world is indeed changing, but it’s not a question of the past being replaced by the future.

As Doctoroff explains, traditional marketing was based on top-down positioning. The brands controlled the message and the channel, and customers were passive recipients. The digital age has given the customer more power in the process, which is now more bottom-up than top-down. Many marketing books tout this dichotomy as mutually exclusive; in other words, bottom-up has replaced top-down marketing. For Doctoroff, this is a false dichotomy. Marketing today is both bottom-up and top-down. That is why social media marketing is booming, but so is television ad purchasing.

Successful Marketing Today

The secret to successful marketing today, writes Doctoroff, is to know how to meld the two approaches together. “We must permit consumers to participate with brands without surrendering the ability to manage the message and what people say about their products,” he writes. The goal of marketers is to develop a life-long relationship between the brand and consumers.

To help companies enable customer engagement while managing the message, Doctoroff offers a framework for marketing based on four “interconnected modules.”

The first two modules are conceptual and focus on customer insight, on one hand, and the brand idea, on the other. No matter how much technology evolves, customer insight must remain at the core of marketing, he writes. Doctoroff describes the human truths shared by all and nation- or region-specific cultural truths, and explains how brands succeed when they can resolve the conflicts among and within these two sets of truths. Mont Blanc pens, for example, are very successful in China because, he writes, the luxury brand reconciles two competing cultural truths: “the desire to project accomplishments but also the need to be understated, to obey the rules.”

The brand idea, in Doctoroff’s words, “crystallizes the long-term relationship between consumer and brand that remains consistent yet evolves over time.” The brand idea emerges from the “fusion” between customer insight and a unique brand offer (UBO). The UBO, he writes, is based on product truths –– physical or emotional characteristics that differentiate the product, and brand truths, which build brand equity in the minds of consumers.

The executional modules of Doctoroff’s framework are engagement ideas, the ideas that will spark consumers to become engaged with the brand, and engagement planning, which is focused on bringing the brand into the lives of consumers. Successful engagement ideas connect to the three levels of passion, he writes: the individual-focused “me,” the community-focused “we” and the global-focused “the world.” For engagement planning, Doctoroff offers a step-by-step engagement system based on marketing communication at every step of the buying process: trigger (the unmet need), consideration, comparison, preference (choosing the brand), purchase and experience.

The core message of Twitter Is Not a Strategy is clearly conveyed when Doctoroff quotes Clive Sirkin, Kimberly-Clark’s global Chief Marketing Officer, who says, “We don’t believe in digital marketing. We believe in marketing in a digital world, and there’s a huge difference.” Twitter Is Not a Strategy also benefits from the global perspective that Doctoroff brings to the subject. His expertise in both China and emerging markets will be of immense value to companies looking to expand into these markets. Doctoroff has written a balanced, informed guide to branding in the 21st century.