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Speed Review: Love It, Don't Leave It

Speed Review: Love It, Don't Leave It

Speed Review: Love It, Don't Leave It

26 Ways to Get What You Want at Work

by Beverly Kaye, Beverly Kaye & Sharon Jordan-Evans

In an era when jobs are harder to find and making the most of what you have is vital, inspiration to stay in a job is needed more than ever. Organizational consultants Beverly Kaye and Sharon Jordan-Evans present a mix of strategy and encouragement to help discouraged employees find the satisfaction they need in the jobs they already have instead of searching for greener pastures elsewhere. Love It, Don’t Leave It presents the questions employees should ask themselves whenever they are disgruntled by their work, and guides them to the answers that can help them enjoy their stay if it is the right choice.

Review

How to Get What You Want From Your Work
In an era when jobs are harder to find and making the most of what you have is vital, inspiration to stay in a job is needed more than ever. Organizational consultants Beverly Kaye and Sharon Jordan-Evans present a mix of strategy and encouragement to help discouraged employees find the satisfaction they need in the jobs they already have instead of searching for greener pastures elsewhere. Love It, Don't Leave It presents the questions employees should ask themselves whenever they are disgruntled by their work, and guides them to the answers that can help them enjoy their stay if it is the right choice.

Every job has its pitfalls. Whether they are jerks at work, bad bosses, poor pay, or just limited career opportunities, the reasons why people leave their work are just as numerous as their reasons to stay. To help people find what it takes to look forward to each new day of work with enthusiasm and appreciation, the authors pack an abundance of tips, hints and tools to achieve workplace satisfaction into each page of Love It, Don't Leave It. At the heart of their 27 chapters are five key messages that can help workers get more from the jobs they already have. They are:

  • What you want could be found right where you are.Sometimes an employee only needs a better perspective of what it is he or she is looking for. The authors advise readers to look inside before they jump outside.
  • You're in charge. We are all responsible for our own workplace satisfaction. Managers are not mind readers and cannot know what would make you happy unless you tell them. The authors write that it is up to you to fix what is wrong or find what is missing.
  • There are at least 26 ways to take the initiative.Love It, Don't Leave It devotes a chapter to each one.
  • Don't wait. Instead of settling for a job that doesn't work for you, take immediate steps to improve it. Waiting for someone else to take the first step could take a long time.
  • Double-check those greener pastures. Many people find the grass elsewhere is not always greener. New workplaces often have the same or different challenges, frustrations and disappointments, so check them out by performing some research before you quit.

Tune Up Your Working Life
The authors offer readers a plethora of actions they can take to get what they need from their work, as well as many stories describing those who have taken those actions. The result is an easy-to-navigate maintenance manual for working adults who want to improve their working lives.

The longer an employee stays with a job, the more equity he or she builds. It can come in the form of skill equity, social equity, influence equity, and financial equity. The authors point out that these forms of equity must be considered before an employee leaves a job, and can play an important role in keeping him or her at a current job. They also explain that an attitude adjustment might be the only thing that is needed to keep someone where his or her equity has already begun to build.

Don't Hold Back
Love It, Don't Leave It
begins with a chapter that calls on employees to ask for the things they want. Although most employees hold back and settle for less, or simply leave before they make their needs clear, the authors explain that managers want to keep solid performers engaged and on the team. Simply asking for the things that will help you stay satisfied and productive can be the key to improving your work satisfaction. The authors suggest you hold an honest, possibly courageous conversation with your boss to ask for what you really want. To determine what you should ask for, they write that you should interview yourself to find out what you really want.

The authors also advise employees to accept responsibility for what they get out of their work. Don't pass the buck. Evaluate your job and list what you love and hate about it. Take charge and talk to the people who might be able to help you. The authors point out that blaming others rarely gets us what we want and need.

The authors explain that your career is your creation, so you must give some thought and time to planning it. To own your career, they write that you must take the right steps to plan, build and strengthen it. These steps include looking at yourself to discover your interests, values and work skills; uncovering trends and multiple career options; identifying goals, alliances and support; and creating a plan of action.

Why We Like This Book
Love It, Don't Leave It
contains valuable wisdom that every dissatisfied employee should consider before leaving a job. It also describes the actions workers should take and the questions they should ask that can help them advance their careers and improve their working lives. Pinpointing problems and solutions, and encouraging active workplace participation, it provides reminders about the power workers should never forget they have.