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Management

Soundview Executive Book Summaries® publishes summaries of the best business books of each year on management issues including change management, managing people, crisis management, managing a virtual workforce, project management and more. Browse our extensive collection of management book summaries to solve your most difficult issues.

  • Image of Results Without Authority
    Image of Results Without Authority

    Controlling a Project When the Team Doesn’t Report to You

    by Tom Kendrick

    Learn new information on: agile methods and evolving project management tools; strategies for working with virtual teams; analytical versus "blink" decision processes; and the myth of multitasking.

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  • Image of Project Management for Non-Project Managers
    Image of Project Management for Non-Project Managers

    by Jack Ferraro

    Functional managers with even basic project management (PM) knowledge are the best people for keeping projects business-focused. This new book demystifies the jargon and processes, encouraging managers to jump into the PM arena and arming them with strategies for increasing the business value created by their company's projects.

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  • Image of The Optimistic Workplace
    Image of The Optimistic Workplace

    Creating an Environment That Energizes Everyone

    by Shawn Murphy

    CEO of Switch & Shift Shawn Murphy argues that our best work is the product of a positive environment. In The Optimistic Workplace, using simple strategies, he demonstrates how a people-centric focus ignites employee potential, increases innovation and catapults an organization to higher performance.

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  • Image of Manager Redefined
    Image of Manager Redefined

    The Competitive Advantage in the Middle of Your Organization

    by Thomas H. Davenport

    In Manager Redefined, Tom Davenport and Stephen Harding explains that managers must build human capital and create employee engagement by managing them almost not at all. The authors view supervisors and managers as centers of insight and influence, underappreciated in many organizations, but endowed nevertheless with the potential to make dramatic contributions to enterprise success. They urge companies to think of their managers as potential sources of competitive advantage.

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  • Image of What Really Works
    Image of What Really Works

    The 4+2 Formula for Sustained Business Success

    by Bruce Roberson, William Joyce, Nitin Nohria

    What really works? Today’s managers realize all too painfully that many, many things matter in achieving business success, but few of them can tell you much more than what worked for them. The authors of What Really Works conducted a 10-year study that turned 50 academics and business consultants loose on dozens of companies, looking for the answer to that elusive mystery — What really works? From that study emerged the 4+2 Theory, which provides the correct combination of primary and s

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  • Image of Play to Your Strengths
    Image of Play to Your Strengths

    Managing Your Company's Internal Labor Markets for Lasting Competitive Advantage

    by Dave Kieffer, Richard R. Guzzo, Jay Doherty, Haig R. Nalbantian

    According to Haig R. Nalbantian, Richard A Guzzo, Dave Kieffer and Jay Doherty, principals of Mercer Human Resource Consulting, a new, fact-based science of human capital management has emerged that is based on systems thinking, determining the correct facts about an organization, and focusing on value. With this new way of managing human capital, executives can use their human capital to its full advantage by aligning the human capital strategy with the business strategy and finally allowing st

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  • Image of The Future of Competition
    Image of The Future of Competition

    Co-Creating Unique Value with Customers

    by CK Prahalad, Venkat Ramaswamy

    In a world of infinite choice, instant gratification, and unbounded opportunities for innovation, why, ask University of Michigan Business School professors C.K. Prahalad and Venkat Ramaswamy, are companies still unable to satisfy customers or sustain growth and profitability? The answer lies in the evolving role of the customer in the value creation process. No longer do customers receive value through the purchase of products and services alone. Instead, the authors explain, individual custome

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