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Management

Soundview Executive Book Summaries® publishes summaries of the best business books of each year on management issues including change management, managing people, crisis management, managing a virtual workforce, project management and more. Browse our extensive collection of management book summaries to solve your most difficult issues.

  • Image of Manager Redefined
    Image of Manager Redefined

    The Competitive Advantage in the Middle of Your Organization

    by Thomas H. Davenport

    In Manager Redefined, Tom Davenport and Stephen Harding explains that managers must build human capital and create employee engagement by managing them almost not at all. The authors view supervisors and managers as centers of insight and influence, underappreciated in many organizations, but endowed nevertheless with the potential to make dramatic contributions to enterprise success. They urge companies to think of their managers as potential sources of competitive advantage.

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  • Image of Consider
    Image of Consider

    Harnessing the Power of Reflective Thinking in Your Organization

    by Daniel Patrick Forrester

    “Stop, think, and don’t do something stupid!” This is the warning Dr. Robert Bea drills into his civil and environmental engineering students at the University of California in Berkeley. There is an intangible and invisible marketplace within our lives today where the products traded are fourfold: attention, distraction, data and meaning. The stories and examples within Consider by Daniel Patrick Forrester demonstrate that the best decisions, insights, ideas and outcomes result when...

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  • Image of The 20% Doctrine
    Image of The 20% Doctrine

    How Tinkering, Goofing Off, and Breaking the Rules at Work Drive Success in Business

    by Ryan Tate

    Gawker tech-blogger and journalist Ryan Tate reveals insight on how businesses can inspire greater creativity and productivity by allowing their employees to pursue their own passions at work. In The 20% Doctrine, Tate examines how companies large and small can incubate valuable innovative advances by making small, specific changes to how work time is approached within their corporate cultures. The concept of “20% Time” originated at Google, but Tate takes examples...

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  • Image of What Really Works
    Image of What Really Works

    The 4+2 Formula for Sustained Business Success

    by Bruce Roberson, William Joyce, Nitin Nohria

    What really works? Today’s managers realize all too painfully that many, many things matter in achieving business success, but few of them can tell you much more than what worked for them. The authors of What Really Works conducted a 10-year study that turned 50 academics and business consultants loose on dozens of companies, looking for the answer to that elusive mystery — What really works? From that study emerged the 4+2 Theory, which provides the correct combination of primary and s

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  • Image of Play to Your Strengths
    Image of Play to Your Strengths

    Managing Your Company's Internal Labor Markets for Lasting Competitive Advantage

    by Dave Kieffer, Richard R. Guzzo, Jay Doherty, Haig R. Nalbantian

    According to Haig R. Nalbantian, Richard A Guzzo, Dave Kieffer and Jay Doherty, principals of Mercer Human Resource Consulting, a new, fact-based science of human capital management has emerged that is based on systems thinking, determining the correct facts about an organization, and focusing on value. With this new way of managing human capital, executives can use their human capital to its full advantage by aligning the human capital strategy with the business strategy and finally allowing st

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  • Image of The Future of Competition
    Image of The Future of Competition

    Co-Creating Unique Value with Customers

    by CK Prahalad, Venkat Ramaswamy

    In a world of infinite choice, instant gratification, and unbounded opportunities for innovation, why, ask University of Michigan Business School professors C.K. Prahalad and Venkat Ramaswamy, are companies still unable to satisfy customers or sustain growth and profitability? The answer lies in the evolving role of the customer in the value creation process. No longer do customers receive value through the purchase of products and services alone. Instead, the authors explain, individual custome

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